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Posts Tagged ‘Payroll’

It’s almost tax time! Tips to Streamline Your Year-End Processes.

It’s December already and we wanted to provide some helpful reminders in order to help you streamline your year-end and tax return processes for 2011.

S-Corp Owners Health Insurance Reportable on W-2 – From the IRS: “Heath and accident insurance premiums paid on behalf of the greater than two percent S corporation shareholder-employee are deductible and reportable by the S corporation as wages for income tax withholding purposes on the shareholder-employee’s Form W-2. These benefits are not subject to Social Security or Medicare (FICA) or Unemployment (FUTA) taxes. The additional compensation is included in Box 1 (Wages) of the Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, issued to the shareholder-employee, but would not be included in Boxes 3 and 5 of Form W-2.”

For more information, including information about sole shareholder/employee situations, please see: http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=203100,00.html

NC County Business Property Tax Listings – “Any individual(s) or business(es) owning or possessing personal property used or connected with a business or other income producing purpose must file a county business property listing by January 31, 2012 unless an extension is filed.” For more information on registering for an account and to obtain forms for filing, please visit the following county Triangle, NC County websites as they apply to you.

Wake County – http://www.wakegov.com/tax/forms.htm
Durham County – http://www.co.durham.nc.us/departments/txad/Business_Personal_Property_Taxation.html
Orange County – http://www.co.orange.nc.us/assessor/BusinessPersonalProperty.asp

NC Employment Security Commission Notices – NC ESC will be sending out notices through the end of the year to address any changes in your unemployment insurance rate for 2012. Be sure to provide these to your payroll service provider to update their systems.

1099 Forms Due 01/31/12 – If you have paid or will pay subcontracted vendors more than $600 in non-employee compensation in tax year 2011, you will need to have a W-9 form on file for each of them in order to issue their 1099 form. The W-9 form will allow you to obtain the information needed to determine 1099 eligibility, their taxpayer ID number, and a current address for mailing. The deadline to submit 1099 forms to the taxpayer is January 31st and the deadline to submit to the IRS their copy is February 28th. Failure to file on time can result in penalties.

The W-9 form can be downloaded here: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/fw9.pdf.

Please also see the following IRS Publication http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i1099msc.pdf.

IRS Virtual Tax Workshop – If you would to obtain more information about your tax requirements, the IRS offers a free virtual workshop for small business owners and self-employed individuals at http://www.irsvideos.gov/virtualworkshop/

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Three Tips for Employers Outsourcing Their Payroll

November 1, 2011 2 comments

Three Tips for Employers Outsourcing Their Payroll Special Edition Tax Tip 2011-05, September 2, 2011 via IRS.GOV

Outsourcing payroll duties to third-party service providers can streamline business operations, but the IRS reminds employers that they are ultimately responsible for paying federal tax liabilities. Recent prosecutions of individuals and companies who – acting under the guise of a payroll service provider – have stolen funds intended for payment of employment taxes makes it important that employers who outsource payroll are aware of the following three tips from the IRS:

Employer Responsibility – The employer is ultimately responsible for the deposit and payment of federal tax liabilities. Even though you forward the tax payments to the third party to make the tax deposits, you – the employer – are the responsible party.If the third party fails to make the federal tax payments, the IRS may assess penalties and interest. The employer is liable for all taxes, penalties and interest due. The IRS can also hold you personally liable for certain unpaid federal taxes.

Correspondence – If there are any issues with an account, the IRS will send correspondence to the address of record. The IRS strongly suggests you do not change the address of record to that of the payroll service provider. That could limit your ability to stay informed of tax matters involving your business.

EFTPS  – Choose a payroll service provider that uses the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System. You can register on the EFTPS system to get your own PIN to verify the payments.The IRS web site – http://www.irs.gov has more information on the responsibilities of employers outsourcing payroll, payroll service providers and EFTPS.

via Three Tips for Employers Outsourcing Their Payroll.

for more information about online payroll services: www.netWorthPayroll.com

Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP – North Carolina to Require Employers to Use E-Verify

North Carolina has joined the growing list of states that will require private employers to verify the eligibility of their new hires to work in the United States through E-Verify, a federally administered online system for confirming the identity and employment eligibility of individuals. The new statute, signed by Governor Perdue on June 23, 2011, will phase in its E-Verify requirement over the next two years, eventually applying to all North Carolina employers with twenty-five or more employees.

The New Legislation

The new law will require all North Carolina employers with twenty-five or more employees to enroll in and use E-Verify to check the eligibility of employees to work in the United States. The law applies only to new hires and does not require employers to verify the immigration status of their existing workforce through E-Verify. The law also specifically exempts seasonal temporary employees employed for ninety or fewer days during a consecutive twelve-month period.

The E-Verify requirement will be phased in gradually, depending on the size of the employer. The E-Verify requirement will become effective on October 1, 2012, for employers with 500 or more employees. Employers with 100 to 499 employees will become subject to the requirement on January 1, 2013, and employers with twenty-five to ninety-nine employees will be covered by the law on July 1, 2013.

Once the law takes effect, employers who fail to verify a new hire’s employment eligibility through E-Verify will face civil penalties from the North Carolina Department of Labor, regardless of whether that employee is indeed authorized to work in the United States. The size of potential penalties will vary based on the number of employee verifications the employer failed to make as well as whether the failure constitutes a repeat violation. For any violation, an employer will also be required to submit an affidavit stating that, after consultation with the affected employee, it has requested a verification of the employee’s work authorization through E-Verify.

Potential Legal Questions

Opponents of the North Carolina statute could potentially argue that it is preempted by federal law. Federal immigration law prohibits states from “imposing civil or criminal sanctions” upon those that employ unauthorized aliens, except through “licensing or similar laws.” Although the United States Supreme Court recently upheld Arizona’s E-Verify law in Chamber of Commerce v. Whiting, the Court emphasized that the Arizona law is enforced through suspension of business licenses, rather than through civil or criminal penalties.

The North Carolina law presents a substantially different question from that resolved by the Supreme Court in Whiting. On the one hand, North Carolina’s new statute arguably runs afoul of federal law because it is enforced through civil penalties. On the other hand, the North Carolina law does not directly penalize the employment of unauthorized aliens; rather, it penalizes employers for failing to use the E-Verify system, even if those employers employ no unauthorized aliens. As North Carolina’s law departs from the model of the Arizona E-Verify law that survived a Supreme Court challenge, the new law could face its own legal challenges.

Practical Implications

Employers in North Carolina that have twenty-five or more employees should prepare to enroll in and use the E-Verify system, if they are not already participating in that system. E-Verify compares information provided by a new hire on Form I-9 with information in the federal government’s databases to verify the individual’s identity and eligibility to work in the United States. Although E-Verify is a free service, participating employers will incur costs in using it as a result of the time it takes the employer’s personnel to be trained in the use of E-Verify, to enter data into the E-Verify system, and to respond to E-Verify determinations that information supplied on a new hire’s Form I-9 does not match government records.

via Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP – North Carolina to Require Employers to Use E-Verify.

Steps For Adding Payroll Services To Your Business

If your small business is growing, and it’s time to add an employee, you may be wondering just where to start to begin this process (our focus for this blog is NC because that’s where we are located, your state requirements may differ). Most of the time, your payroll service provider will give you a checklist and packet of forms to complete in order to add employees to your payroll. There are three major components that will be needed to set your company up for payroll services.

First, you will need a Federal EIN, otherwise known as an Employer Identification Number. You may have already received this when you started your business but if you are a sole proprietor, you may need to apply for a new number:

http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=97860,00.html

Secondly, you will need a State Withholding Tax Id Number. If you already collect and file Sales and Use Tax, the number will be the same and you just need to call the state and add withholding tax to that existing number.  To apply for a new NC withholding account number, you can apply online here:

http://www.dornc.com/electronic/registration/index.html

Third, you will need a new NC Unemployment Security Commission account number to collect and remit state unemployment insurance withholding:

https://www.ncesc1.com/business/web604/web604Main.asp

Now that the main peices for the employer portion are out of the way, let’s take a look at what forms the employees will need to provide in order to receive payroll wages. The employer must retain these documents for their records for each employee:

W-4 Form (Withholding Allowance)

I-9 (Employment Eligibility Verification)

NC-4 (State Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate)

In NC, employers must also provide New Hire Information to the state. A form can be mailed or you can report your new hires online at www.NCNewHires.com.

For more information about whether a worker is an Employee or Independent Contractor, see: Employee or Independent Contractor?

Contact netWorth Bookkeeping Services for more information about our  easy, affordable, online payroll services